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New App For "Constructive Criticism" Turns Negative

I think people have forgotten what "constructive criticism" actually means. 

Depending on how mixed your social media feed is with people in the millennial realm, a new app has been taking up the time 0f users called Sarahah and has been - with no shock to anyone, is being used inappropriately.

What seemed like a fun time for users - having people message you anonymously to give you constructive criticism, has turned into people digging into your personal flaws, or otherwise sending unsolicited hate to the user.

The allure of being able to tell someone something you've been wanting to say, but your lack of courage had you holding back is truthfully a human curiosity of if the user will have a response. Many users have been posting screenshots of the messages they have received and have been responding to them (mostly on Facebook), but quite a few people have been receiving negative responses, furthermore perpetuating the cyber bully culture.

Fortune shares that "There have already been several reports of widespread bullying on the service, with some users even complaining in app store reviews of the app about instances of racist messages and other harassment."

If you've got a thick skin, you can totally try it out - but to be honest, if you can't handle any sort of criticism, constructive or not, it might be best to avoid.

According to NoBullying.com, "52 per cent of young people report being cyber bullied," and that this can include "trolling" of a particular post online using negative or mean commentary, impersonating other users, or sharing photos without permission of the user.

Luckily, Sarahah doesn't allow you to send photographs, or a whole new slew of issues would occur.

To check out the app, you can find it on the App Store or Google Play.

 

Amy Cooper is a tech-enlightened individual, who studies the correlation between the internet and social response of tech infused lifestyles.